2023 WAEC F/Accounting (Essay & OBJ) Answers [23rd May]
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WAEC May/June 2023 FREE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING QUESTION AND ANSWER ROOM [School Candidates]

Tuesday, 23rd May, 2023
Financial Accounting 2 (Essay) – 09:30am – 12:00pm
Financial Accounting 1 (Objective) – 12:00pm – 1:00pm


2023 WAEC FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING OBJECTIVE ANSWERS

1-10: BBBCDCACCB
11-20: CADBAABAAC
21-30: DDDCBBABDB
31-40: BCCADCDBAC
41-50: BBDBCCBBAB

2023 WAEC FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING ESSAY ANSWERS:

(1a)
Incomplete records refers to a situation where a business or individual lacks certain essential accounting records or information necessary for accurate and comprehensive financial reporting.

OR

Incomplete records refers to a method of financial accounting where a business or individual maintains an incomplete set of accounting records. It means that essential accounting information, such as transactions, financial statements, and supporting documents, is missing or insufficiently recorded

(1b)
(PICK ANY THREE)
(i) Lack of knowledge or understanding: The business may lack the necessary knowledge or understanding of proper accounting practices, resulting in incomplete or inaccurate record-keeping.

(ii) Insufficient resources: Small businesses or startups with limited resources may not have the financial means to invest in sophisticated accounting software or hire professional accountants. As a result, they may struggle to maintain complete and accurate financial records.

(iii) Time constraints: Business owners or employees may be overwhelmed with day-to-day operations and find it challenging to allocate enough time to maintain comprehensive financial records. This can lead to incomplete or delayed recording of financial transactions.

(iv) Negligence or oversight: In some cases, business owners or employees may simply overlook the importance of maintaining complete records. They may neglect to document certain transactions or fail to follow proper accounting procedures due to carelessness or lack of attention to detail.

(v) Complexity of transactions: Certain businesses, such as those involved in international trade or complex financial instruments, may encounter transactions that are challenging to record accurately. This complexity can result in incomplete records or errors in financial reporting.

(vi) Legal or regulatory compliance issues: Businesses operating in highly regulated industries may face complex reporting requirements and compliance standards. Failure to understand or adhere to these regulations can lead to incomplete or inaccurate financial records.

(vii) Internal control weaknesses: Inadequate internal control systems within a business can contribute to incomplete record-keeping. Without proper checks and balances, there is a higher risk of errors, omissions, or even intentional manipulation of financial records.

(viii) Fraud or misconduct: In some unfortunate cases, incomplete records may be intentionally maintained as part of fraudulent activities or misconduct. By keeping certain transactions off the books or manipulating financial data, individuals within the organization may attempt to deceive stakeholders or evade taxes.

(1c)
(PICK ANY THREE)
(i) The business may lack the necessary knowledge or understanding of proper accounting practices, resulting in incomplete or inaccurate record-keeping.

(ii) Small businesses or startups with limited resources may not have the financial means to invest in sophisticated accounting software or hire professional accountants. As a result, they may struggle to maintain complete and accurate financial records.

(iii) Business owners may be overwhelmed with day-to-day operations and find it challenging to allocate enough time to maintain comprehensive financial records.

(iv) In some cases, business owners or employees may simply overlook the importance of maintaining complete records by neglecting to document certain transactions or fail to follow proper accounting procedures due to carelessness or lack of attention to detail.

(v) Certain businesses, such as those involved in international trade or complex financial instruments, may encounter transactions that are challenging to record accurately. This complexity can result in incomplete records or errors in financial reporting.

(vi) Businesses operating in highly regulated industries may face complex reporting requirements and compliance standards. Failure to understand or adhere to these regulations can lead to incomplete or inaccurate financial records.

(vii) Inadequate internal control systems within a business can contribute to incomplete record-keeping. Without proper checks and balances, there is a higher risk of errors, omissions, or even intentional manipulation of financial records.
(viii) Incomplete records may be intentionally maintained as part of fraudulent activities or misconduct. By keeping certain transactions off the books or manipulating financial data, individuals within the organization may attempt to deceive stakeholders or evade taxes. 

(3)
(PICK ANY FIVE)
(i) Investors
(ii) Creditors
(iii) Managers
(iv) Government
(v) Employees
(vi) Shareholders
(vii) Suppliers
(viii) Competitors
(ix) Financial Analysts
(x) General Public.

THEIR RESPECTIVE INTERESTS IN THE ACCOUNTING INFORMATION:
(PICK ANY FIVE U PICKED ABOVE)
(i) Investors: Investors are interested in accounting information to assess the financial health and performance of a company. They use this information to make informed investment decisions and evaluate the potential returns and risks associated with their investments.

(ii) Creditors: Creditors, such as banks and suppliers, use accounting information to determine the creditworthiness and financial stability of a company. They rely on this information to assess the company's ability to repay loans or fulfill financial obligations.

(iii) Managers: Managers within an organization use accounting information to monitor and evaluate the financial performance of the company. They rely on this information to make strategic decisions, allocate resources, and identify areas for improvement or cost-saving measures.

(iv) Government Agencies: Government agencies, such as tax authorities and regulatory bodies, use accounting information to ensure compliance with financial reporting standards, assess tax liabilities, and monitor the financial health of businesses within their jurisdiction.

(v) Employees: Employees are interested in accounting information, particularly financial statements, to evaluate the financial stability and profitability of the company they work for. It helps them gauge job security and potential for career growth within the organization.

(vi) Shareholders: Shareholders, who own shares in a company, are interested in accounting information to assess the company's financial performance, dividends, and overall value. This information helps them evaluate the returns on their investment and make decisions related to buying or selling shares.

(vii) Suppliers: Suppliers analyze accounting information to evaluate the financial stability and payment capability of their customers. This helps them assess the creditworthiness and manage any risks associated with extending credit or providing goods and services on credit terms.

(viii) Competitors: Competitors may use accounting information, such as financial statements, to benchmark their own performance against industry peers. It provides insights into the financial strategies and competitive position of other companies, aiding in strategic decision-making.

(ix) Financial Analysts: Financial analysts rely on accounting information to analyze and interpret financial statements, assess company performance, and make recommendations to investors or clients. They use this information to provide insights, forecasts, and valuations of companies.

(x) General Public: The general public, including consumers and the local community, may have an interest in accounting information to evaluate the financial stability, ethical practices, and social responsibility of companies. This information can influence public perception, consumer behavior, and public trust in the organization.

(4a)
Accounting ratios are mathematical calculations used to evaluate and analyze the financial performance and position of a company. These ratios are derived from the financial statements, such as the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement, and provide insights into various aspects of a company's operations, profitability, liquidity, solvency, and efficiency.

OR

Accounting ratios, also known as financial ratios, are quantitative tools used to analyze and interpret financial statements. They are derived from the financial data contained in the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement of a company. Accounting ratios help assess the financial performance, efficiency, liquidity, profitability, and solvency of an organization.

EXAMPLE OF LIQUIDITY RATIO:
(Pick Any ONE)
-Current ratio
-Quick ratio
-Cash ratio

(4b)
(PICK ANY THREE)
(i) Accounting ratios are used to assess the overall performance of a company by analyzing key indicators such as return on investment (ROI), return on assets (ROA), and return on equity (ROE).
(ii) Accounting ratios such as current ratio, quick ratio, and debt-to-equity ratio help assess the financial health and stability of a business.
(iii) Accounting ratios such as gross profit margin, net profit margin, and return on sales (ROS) are used to measure a company's profitability.
(iv) Accounting ratios like current ratio and quick ratio help evaluate a company's liquidity position and its ability to meet short-term obligations.
(v) Accounting ratios play a crucial role in investment analysis by allowing investors use ratios like earnings per share (EPS), price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio, and dividend yield to assess the investment potential of a company's stock.
(vi) Lenders and creditors use accounting ratios to evaluate a company's creditworthiness and determine its borrowing capacity.
(vii) Accounting ratios are used to compare a company's performance with industry averages or competitors.

(4c)
(PICK ANY THREE)
(i) Accounting ratios are based on historical financial statements, which may not accurately reflect the current financial position or future prospects of a company.
(ii) Accounting ratios provide numerical indicators but often lack the context behind the numbers.
(iii) Accounting ratios heavily rely on the accuracy and reliability of financial statements. However, financial statements can be subjective and influenced by management judgments, accounting policies, and potential manipulation. Inaccurate or misleading financial statements can lead to distorted ratio analysis.
(iv) Accounting ratios primarily focus on financial data, such as balance sheets and income statements, while excluding non-financial aspects like customer satisfaction, employee morale, or brand value.
(v) Varying reporting practices of different companies can distort the accuracy and comparability of ratios, limiting their usefulness for benchmarking or industry analysis.
(vi) Financial statements are typically prepared on a quarterly or annual basis, leading to a time lag between the occurrence of events and their reflection in the ratios.
(vii) Accounting ratios often overlook non-financial factors such as environmental sustainability, social responsibility, or corporate governance practices.

2023 WAEC F/Accounting (Essay & OBJ) Answers [23rd May]
 

2023 WAEC F/Accounting (Essay & OBJ) Answers [23rd May]

2023 WAEC F/Accounting (Essay & OBJ) Answers [23rd May]

2023 WAEC F/Accounting (Essay & OBJ) Answers [23rd May]

2023 WAEC F/Accounting (Essay & OBJ) Answers [23rd May]


2023 WAEC F/Accounting (Essay & OBJ) Answers [23rd May]

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TO SUBSCRIBE FOR 2023 WAEC FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING ANSWERS
  1. JUST GO OUT AND BUY MTN CARDS OF N800 (400 + 400 = 800)
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